Daisy Tales .3.

20, broke and still searching.
The Late and Great King. 

The Late and Great King. 

Isn’t it Though. 

Isn’t it Though. 

Striving to Keep Faith.

Striving to Keep Faith.

Sensible Thoughts. 

Sensible Thoughts. 

Justin Lynch beating Michael Phelps record at just 16.

Black Excellence. 

(Source: thefitrasta, via getjasionit)

Feeling It.

enattendantlesoleil:

me during classes

  • "that’s racist"
  • "that’s sexist"
  • "there are more than two genders"
  • "ok but could we maybe not use that word"
  • "that’s ableist"
  • "there aren’t enough girls in here"

Every Single One. 

(via blackmagicalgirlmisandry)


Re-imagine: Black Women in Britain at the Black Cultural Archives 
If you are in London, or can get to London, please do yourself a favour and head on to Brixton to visit the Black Cultural Archives’s opening exhibition, Re-Imagine: Black Women in Britain.
I attended the opening of the Archives last week held and I have no words for it. There are no words to describe the significance of 3000 or so Black people gathering on Windrush Square and taking back Brixton from the growing wave of white middle class gentrifiers. It was moving, really and truly. The feeling continued later when seemingly everyone spilled into Brixton Village Market and again took back a space that has been stolen from Brixton’s Black community. 
The exhibition itself acts to fill in silences around Britain’s Black women, tracing the history of Black women from as early as pre-17th century and finishing in the 21st century with Doreen Lawrence. The narrative of Black women in Britain has been characterised by glaring abscences and invisibility but this space throws the narrative to the wind: Black women are not invisible, they are here for you to see. There is Olive Morris in one corner and her mother, Doris Morris, in another; Mary Seacole’s photograph is proudly displayed beside that of Jessica Huntley. Please, please go and see it. You will not regret it. 

Can’t Wait to See This!

Re-imagine: Black Women in Britain at the Black Cultural Archives 

If you are in London, or can get to London, please do yourself a favour and head on to Brixton to visit the Black Cultural Archives’s opening exhibition, Re-Imagine: Black Women in Britain.

I attended the opening of the Archives last week held and I have no words for it. There are no words to describe the significance of 3000 or so Black people gathering on Windrush Square and taking back Brixton from the growing wave of white middle class gentrifiers. It was moving, really and truly. The feeling continued later when seemingly everyone spilled into Brixton Village Market and again took back a space that has been stolen from Brixton’s Black community. 

The exhibition itself acts to fill in silences around Britain’s Black women, tracing the history of Black women from as early as pre-17th century and finishing in the 21st century with Doreen Lawrence. The narrative of Black women in Britain has been characterised by glaring abscences and invisibility but this space throws the narrative to the wind: Black women are not invisible, they are here for you to see. There is Olive Morris in one corner and her mother, Doris Morris, in another; Mary Seacole’s photograph is proudly displayed beside that of Jessica Huntley. Please, please go and see it. You will not regret it. 

Can’t Wait to See This!

(via vrtd)

lettertotheclass:

booksexual:

cultural appropriation is putting fireflies in a jar

and letting them light up your bedroom

as you drift off to sleep.

and when you wake up all the lights have flickered out

but only when you’re older do you realize

you slowly suffocated them so

that you could enjoy their glow.

that just knocked the breath from me

(via whitegirlsaintshit)

getjasionit asked: Being a black person, and personally pro-black womanist. I follow a lot of pro-black blogs and have been unlearning all of the white supremacist bullshit I've been brainwashed to accept, but I'm wondering how would you describe blackness? I know all black people aren't the same and I'm aware of the stereotypes but what is the "standard of blackness"? Is there a standard? I just want to know and I figured you are an amazing authority on the matter.

whatwhiteswillneverknow:

Short and simple:

I am defining Blackness as I speak. As I move through life, I define and redefine it. I change the standard.

I can be as articulate as Obama one minute and as rude and rowdy as 50 Cent the next. 

I can be as dissecting ideology as Malcolm X one minute and ratchet as DMX the next.

I can be insightful as Nelson Mandela, peaceful like Martin Luther King, arrogant like Kanye West, cool and calm as Common. 

I’m as simple as Biggie Smalls or complex as Tupac.

The only standard is the one you create.

Simple as That.